Not an Extrovert? You Can Still Market Your Business

Not an Extrovert? You Can Still Market Your Business

It seems that a considerable amount of marketing and sales advice to self-employed professionals is aimed at extroverts. “Go to networking events and meet new people,” the authorities say. “Speak in front of groups.” “Call people up and chat with them.”

If you are an introvert, these experts might as well be telling you to fly to the moon. What if you don’t enjoy public gatherings, dislike being the center of attention, and hate to call strangers on the phone? Can you still do well at personal marketing?

Don’t Know How to Sell? You Can Still Have Sales Conversations

Don’t Know How to Sell? You Can Still Have Sales Conversations

Many self-employed professionals believe they don’t know how to sell. You’re justified if you think that of yourself. You didn’t go into business to be a salesperson. You became self-employed because you wanted to help people with web design or personal training or architecture or resumé writing. In order to get clients, you need to have sales conversations, but they aren’t something you’ve ever trained to do. You may even believe you’re no good at them.

Let’s fix that.

Written Content Can Be the Answer to Your Follow-Up Woes

Written Content Can Be the Answer to Your Follow-Up Woes

To the average self-employed professional, following up with prospective clients feels awkward or even scary. You hate making phone calls that might not be welcome. You think you might be pestering people. You worry about being rejected. You aren’t sure what to say. After all, how many times can you ask, “Are you ready for us to work together?”

I get it. My clients and students share concerns like these with me all the time. I’ve even had them myself.

Two Ways to Make Direct Contact Easier

Two Ways to Make Direct Contact Easier

When thinking about the best way to get new business, it’s often good to remember that contacting a prospect directly can be the most effective tactic. However, this can sometimes seem too scary: the thought of picking up the phone, or meeting someone for coffee, or even sending an email can send a wave of fear through your business heart.
Here are some common fears you might experience when considering reaching out to someone directly:

  • They’ll think I’m bothering them.
  • I don’t know what to say.
  • I’m not a good salesperson.
  • I’m an introvert.
  • I’m not good with words.
  • They won’t remember me.
  • I’m not sure how to make an offer.
Marketing or Selling: Which Is More Important?

Marketing or Selling: Which Is More Important?

A question I often get from clients and students goes something like this: “I’ve been collecting marketing ideas… and I have a drawer full! I also have a stack of promising leads I’ve accumulated. And I know it’s important to stay visible, so I keep marketing, but then I just end up with more names in the stack. How do I prioritize all this?”

If you’ve ever wondered something similar, you may have lost sight of a very important truth — the way to win the business game is not to collect the most leads; it’s to make the most sales.

Prospective Clients WANT to Hear from You

Prospective Clients WANT to Hear from You

Every time I give a marketing workshop or talk to a new coaching client, I hear the question: “Aren’t I bugging people if I keep following up with them?”

The answer is no. The only circumstances under which you would ever be “bugging” prospective clients would be if they’ve already told you they are not at all interested in what you offer, or asked you specifically to stop contacting them. In any other situation, your continued contact with a potential client is not only acceptable, it is often welcome.

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